Understanding Tinnitus

Tinnitus affects 25 to 50 million people in the United States

What is Tinnitus?  Tinnitus (ringing in your head or ears) affects 25 to 50 million people in the United States to some degree.  Chronic tinnitus affects 5-10% of the adult population and is defined as occurring for more than three months.  About .5% of those have severe, debilitating tinnitus.  Tinnitus can cause problems with sleep, hearing, emotion, and concentration.

Tinnitus can sound like ringing, buzzing, crickets, roaring, or water falling to name a few.  Most patients say their tinnitus pitch is closest to tones or noises above 3,000 Hz.  

Common Causes of Tinnitus:  Roughly 90% of those who suffer from tinnitus also have hearing loss.  Tinnitus is more common in men than women and more common with those who have arthritis, hypertension, varicose veins and arteriosclerosis.  There are many ear disorders other than age related and noise induced hearing loss that cause tinnitus.  Some are inner ear hearing loss caused by genetics, drugs used to fight infection, cancer or head injuries.  

Are you seeking treatment for Tinnitus?

There are several treatments for tinnitus. Your Audiologist may recommend one of the following for you:

  • Hearing aids: If you also have a hearing loss, a hearing aid can help you hear better and help mask or cover up your tinnitus. Many hearing aids also offer a tinnitus masking program that produces sound that will also help down out or mask your tinnitus.
  • Retraining: Professionals can also teach you how to avoid thinking about or focusing on your tinnitus. Retraining is often used with tinnitus maskers.
  • Counseling: Some people with tinnitus become depressed and benefit from a counselor or support group.
  • Relaxing: Stress can make tinnitus worse. Learning how to relax can help you rest better and have more energy to deal with tinnitus.
  • Self-help for Tinnitus: These are things you can do to lessen the impact of tinnitus. Listen to recordings of music or sounds of nature to help you forget the tinnitus. Avoid things like smoking, alcohol, and loud noise. Ask people to face you when they talk. Tell them to get your attention first and to talk louder and clearly so you can better understand what they are saying.

For more information, please visit the American Tinnitus Association website at www.ATA.org

Tinnitus affects 25 to 50 million people in the United States

What is Tinnitus?  Tinnitus (ringing in your head or ears) affects 25 to 50 million people in the United States to some degree.  Chronic tinnitus affects 5-10% of the adult population and is defined as occurring for more than three months.  About .5% of those have severe, debilitating tinnitus.  Tinnitus can cause problems with sleep, hearing, emotion, and concentration.

Tinnitus can sound like ringing, buzzing, crickets, roaring, or water falling to name a few.  Most patients say their tinnitus pitch is closest to tones or noises above 3,000 Hz.  

Common Causes of Tinnitus:  Roughly 90% of those who suffer from tinnitus also have hearing loss.  Tinnitus is more common in men than women and more common with those who have arthritis, hypertension, varicose veins and arteriosclerosis.  There are many ear disorders other than age related and noise induced hearing loss that cause tinnitus.  Some are inner ear hearing loss caused by genetics, drugs used to fight infection, cancer or head injuries.  

Are you seeking treatment for Tinnitus?

There are several treatments for tinnitus. Your Audiologist may recommend one of the following for you:

  • Hearing aids: If you also have a hearing loss, a hearing aid can help you hear better and help mask or cover up your tinnitus. Many hearing aids also offer a tinnitus masking program that produces sound that will also help down out or mask your tinnitus.
  • Retraining: Professionals can also teach you how to avoid thinking about or focusing on your tinnitus. Retraining is often used with tinnitus maskers.
  • Counseling: Some people with tinnitus become depressed and benefit from a counselor or support group.
  • Relaxing: Stress can make tinnitus worse. Learning how to relax can help you rest better and have more energy to deal with tinnitus.
  • Self-help for Tinnitus: These are things you can do to lessen the impact of tinnitus. Listen to recordings of music or sounds of nature to help you forget the tinnitus. Avoid things like smoking, alcohol, and loud noise. Ask people to face you when they talk. Tell them to get your attention first and to talk louder and clearly so you can better understand what they are saying.

For more information, please visit the American Tinnitus Association website at www.ATA.org